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      • Open Group technical document: IT Specialist Certification Accreditation Policy

        Clearly “book learning” is a critical first step to becoming effective at anything. But the effectiveness, potential, and the degree and value of contribution rise to a new level as relevant skills and experience are gained in a topical area. It is clearly important to “know” a subject, but it is more valuable to have applied that knowledge. It is for this reason that The Open Group IT Specialist Certification (ITSC) program is based on an assessment of people skills, technical skills, and experience, not just tests of knowledge.

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      • Determine if NoSQL databases are right for your organization

        NoSQL databases offer more flexible alternatives to mainstream relational software, particularly for big data applications. But NoSQL offerings include a diverse set of technologies that can present prospective users with a bewildering array of choices. And those technologies have yet to secure a place in many organizations. In fact, in a survey of IT and business professionals conducted by The Data Warehousing Institute in November 2013, 65% of the respondents said they had no plans to incorporate NoSQL databases into their data warehouse architectures. Don't let that scare you off, though: There are companies successfully putting NoSQL products to work in applications they're suited for.

        In this three-part guide, readers will learn about the different types of NoSQL technologies and their potential uses. First, get details about the four primary NoSQL product categories, with deployment examples from experienced users and advice on how to avoid going down the wrong database path. Next, read about why it's a mistake to force-fit technologies into IT environments -- and why Gartner analyst Merv Adrian says it's a fruitless exercise to compare NoSQL offerings "that are so wildly different in structure and intent." And in our third story, find out why many organizations are creating what consultancy Enterprise Management Associates calls a hybrid data ecosystem -- a blend of old and new technologies, including NoSQL systems -- to support their big data environments.

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      • Staying secure, HIPAA compliant with mobile technologies

        The integration of health data systems with phones, tablets, laptops and other mobile devices is one of the biggest challenges facing healthcare IT professionals. That, readers will soon learn, is easier said than done.

        In this three-part guide, we clear away some of the cobweb-ridden concerns around mobile device management. First, readers will take a look at the repercussions of recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration draft guidance. While makers of new mobile personal health apps are rejoicing over news that the FDA will not regulate mobile device data systems (MDDS), it's a potential nightmare for healthcare providers. Experts say the move leaves medical devices with an extremely low barrier for safety -- and no checks and balances to speak of.

        Next, we attempt to understand why -- even with the technology to support it -- adoption of mHealth apps is so low. To that end, health IT consultant Reda Chouffani points to areas where mobile healthcare could serve to enhance the care experience. We close with a look at patient engagement, as mandated in stage 2 meaningful use criteria. Many in healthcare are looking to technology -- electronic communication, primarily -- to involve patients in their care, and the pressure to effectively address patient engagement safety is mounting. Here, we outline the steps hospitals everywhere must take to do just that.

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      • Time to get serious about endpoint security

        22 July 2014

        Includes:
        • CIO Interview: Simon Hill, Caravan Club
        • Can UK fintech startups survive outside London?
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      • Manufacturing IT best practices: ERP upgrades and migrations

        Read this expert e-book to get comprehensive answers to all your ERP upgrade and migration questions. Inside, find: expert advice on recognizing when it's time to upgrade or migrate; tips for making a business case; the top five questions to ask before buying ERP systems; and best practices for a successful implementation process.

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      • Best BI and analytics options for midmarket manufacturers

        BI is everywhere and it is becoming more affordable for even smaller midmarket manufacturers. As a matter of fact, it's actually becoming possible for this type of business to implement the same sort of BI that even the largest enterprises use. In the following e-handbook, learn how to get the same high-potency BI that the largest organizations use and most importantly, learn where and when to use BI without straining your IT staff.

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      • E-book: Manufacturing business intelligence best practices

        In this e-book, experienced technology writer Lauren Gibbons Paul shares her insight on utilizing BI in the manufacturing field. Find effective strategies for manufacturing business intelligence that can make a difference in your organization.

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      • How to get started with business intelligence in manufacturing

        Facing increasing pressures from globalization and a sagging economy, manufacturers are between a rock and a hard spot. And many of them see business intelligence as an escape route. But does BI hold the answers for every manufacturer? How does BI differ from manufacturing intelligence? This e-book will answer these important questions about using business intelligence in manufacturing, and more.

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      • Business intelligence and analytics for optimized supply chain management

        This e-book discusses how analytics technology can transform supply chains by improving visibility, making it a more efficient process, and contributing to more timely, accurate predictions. Learn how to best utilize business Intelligence and analytics for optimizing supply chain management -- and more.

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      • Understanding workforce management technology for manufacturing

        Workforce management technology can help manufacturers improve operational efficiency and reduce costs by streamlining scheduling, budgeting, and labor planning. Thanks to the web and mobile platforms, it is now more accessible outside the office. Learn the benefits of automating workforce management and read expert advice on getting started.

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      • Multiple systems, new technologies add to ERP integration challenges

        Multiple software systems -- particularly, multiple enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems -- are a problem facing a surprising number of organizations today. There are some important downsides to having multiple systems at work, too: complexity, cost, inflexibility and lack of accurate data among them. What is an organization to do? Consolidate through integration.

        In this three-part guide, readers will take a comprehensive look at the myriad rules and repercussions integral to the success of any ERP integration project. To begin, Rajeev Ranjan, senior associate consultant at Infosys Limited, outlines the four factors that must be assessed before igniting any ERP consolidation plan: business process, user perspective, technology and cost. Next, we dig into the mobile and cloud computing technologies further complicating ERP processes today. While they alleviate many challenges with ERP integration, they prompt a host of new ones. Now that we have covered where ERP is today, we close with a look at where it might be tomorrow. Specifically, how the increasingly blurred line between ERP and supply chain management will influence future integration projects.

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      • Tips for managing multiple ERP systems

        Read this expert e-guide to learn how to minimize the chaos of managing multiple enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Learn how a two-tiered approach, including Software as a Service (SaaS) ERP at the subsidiary level, is helping many manufacturers consolidate their ERP efforts.

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      • Machine-to-machine communications enliven warehouse management

        Manufacturers can find many uses for machine to machine technology outside their walls—from shipment tracking to remote diagnostics—but the technology can also bring split-second data visibility inside as well. This handbook gives an introduction to M2M technology and explains its uses in the warehouse, with strategies for selecting and implementing M2M for warehouse management and instructions on how to optimize the warehouse management potential of M2M investments.

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      • Cloud computing: What it can do for your manufacturing supply

        Cloud-based manufacturing applications have exploded onto the market, and with so much hype, determining their suitability and usefulness can be tricky. Read this expert e-book to get tips on how the cloud can be leveraged for ERP, supply chain management, and global inventory management, and learn what to look out for in a still-maturing market.

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      • Hosted ERP or SaaS ERP: What’s right for your organization?

        Read this e-book to compare traditional hosted enterprise resource planning (ERP) apps to Software as a Service (SaaS) ERP. Uncover the benefits and challenges of each alternative and decide which is best for your organization.

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      • Compare business needs with the ERP choices available

        The risks of picking a bad ERP system or implementing it poorly are as significant as the opportunities for efficiency, collaboration and innovation that can come from finding the perfect system. And with today's ERP market boasting more choices than ever before, organizations don't have it easy.

        In this three-part guide, the ERP experts at Panorama Consulting Solutions tell readers how to choose wisely. They start simply: Keep your eyes open. Often, organizations fall victim to the marketing and publicity around larger vendors -- neglecting to explore smaller companies that, in Panorama's experience, are often a better fit. Next, they take a look at Software as a Service ERP systems. Compared with traditional, on-premises systems, software functionality delivered via the Internet -- as in SaaS and open source systems -- is an exciting trend in the ERP market. But while it might appeal to companies as a lower-cost alternative, there are some big risks involved. To close, they detail the seven factors they say are critical to any successful ERP implementation -- including whether your organization needs an ERP system at all.

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      • Shop for midmarket ERP software that will boost the bottom line

        With an ever-increasing number of ERP vendors, searching for the right ERP software in today's market makes finding a needle in a haystack look easy. But it can be done. In fact, it's gaining real traction in the world of manufacturing. And, while cloud models like Software as a Service have historically been seen as the most feasible option for midsize companies, IT departments today are discovering a host of options -- everything from hosted ERP to public clouds.

        In this three-part guide, our editors go beyond the hype. First, readers will get one manufacturer's firsthand account of moving its ERP systems to the cloud -- and the benefits and challenges encountered on the way up. Next, analyst China Martens offers expert advice on the types of questions IT manufacturers need to be asking before making software buying decisions. Finally, readers will get a boost ahead of the competition with our curated list of the top ERP vendors.

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      • Do your homework before integrating software systems

        Many manufacturers want to circumvent the often long and arduous process of software systems integration by collecting new ERP, supply chain management and other business applications. This might work in the short term, but what does it mean in the long term? And when does a manufacturer integrate rather than add to its data systems? In this handbook, you’ll find information on when and why integration is key -- as well as advice on proper business strategies for integrating software systems.

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      • Manufacturing ERP Buyer’s Guide – 2011 Edition

        Compiled by SearchManufacturingERP.com editors, this directory includes ERP software products for process and discrete manufacturers of all sizes, as well as all verticals. It includes software that is meant to be deployed on-premise as well as Software as a Service (SaaS) or on-demand software.

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      • Lean manufacturing and ERP: How to leverage ERP to get lean

        A manufacturing firm adopting the principles of lean manufacturing can effectively leverage the company’s ERP system during its transition to lean. This e-book explains what part of the plant you should start with; the importance of simplifying the ERP system; how to balance the ERP system with lean principles; and what pitfalls to avoid.

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      • Navigate the e-procurement technology landscape

        E-sourcing and e-procurement technology have created new opportunities to save money, improve supplier performance -- even make better products. Called e-sourcing and e-procurement, the tools may very well help organizations change the way they buy the materials and goods they need. Online communities give manufacturers a comprehensive view of available suppliers, allowing them to see who is offering what and then negotiate deals. And vendors have been developing a whole range of new products with features like spend analytics, supplier performance management and contract lifecycle management.

        But though many manufacturers use basic e-sourcing tools for requests for proposals and auctions to cut sourcing costs and cycle times, most don't tap them for their full potential and thus are losing out on the real prizes: a clear return on investment, better supplier relationships and innovative new products. In this three-part handbook, we look into the various new e-procurement and e-sourcing tools and their features. We talk to industry experts about the best ways to improve ROI, and we explore e-procurement strategies that are beneficial to both manufacturer and supplier.

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      • Improving effectiveness and adoption in ERP procurement to drive increased savings

        This e-book provides tips on how to increase the value of your ERP – and your supply chain – with tools for more effective collaboration. Find out more about using ERP procurement to drive increased savings.

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      • Manage supply chain risks with the right technology

        With supply chain management processes expanded to cover the globe, manufacturing executives are hard-pressed to make sense of it all. In this three-part guide, veteran IT journalist Beth Stackpole and other industry observers discuss the key technologies for supply chain planning and execution -- the twin pillars of supply chain management (SCM) -- in today's global manufacturing world.

        First, readers will learn about software deployment options -- including business intelligence and transportation management capabilities -- in an increasingly integrated and interdependent supply chain. Next, we drill down on the actual act of deployment and the many factors manufacturers must consider to find the right SCM software for them. We close with a look at the long-established technologies -- such as bar codes and radio-frequency identification -- that continue to ensure supply management success, even among newer, flashier tools.

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      • Improving supply chain visibility via technology

        Brush up on the latest technologies for supply chain visibility that will improve efficiency and get your company a higher ROI. In this e-book, find articles that explore the latest options for supply chain visibility, and learn how to determine if your organization really needs supply chain visibility software. Plus, find out how this technology can help you meet compliance needs, and how to get the most return from your supply chain investments.

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      • Identification options for supply chain management

        Supply chain tracking is an obvious manufacturing necessity -- having a handle on where your products are at any given time is crucial to ensuring the quality of your services. But there are several options available under the AIDC (automatic identification and data capture) umbrella. In this expert handbook, discover the benefits and drawbacks of three main AIDC technologies: bar codes, RFID, and GPS tracking systems. See which technology best suits your manufacturing needs according to expert analysis of each system. Get the latest information on supply chain management and more in this guide.

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Featured E-ZINES on searchManufacturingERP.comView all >>

  • Business Information

    Cloud computing, mobile devices and massive amounts of data flowing into organizations are combining to put heavy pressure on business systems. To adapt, organizations have been forced to transform the way in which corporate information is managed.

  • Modern Infrastructure

    Modern Infrastructure covers the convergence of technologies -- from cloud computing to virtualization to mobile devices -- and the impact on data centers.

ALL TECHTARGET E-ZINES

Featured E-BOOKS on searchManufacturingERP.comView all >>

  • Forging the path to tomorrow's CRM

    Perhaps no two words have more of an effect on business today than "customer experience." Consumers have a wealth of options for buying products and services -- and they're not shy about letting the social media sphere know when they’re not happy. To keep them coming -- and coming back -- organizations need to ensure that the experiences they’re serving up are nothing less than stellar.

    In our e-book series, The Risks and Rewards of Customer Experience Management, readers will get practical advice and real-world insight into strategies that place the focus of organizations' operations and processes on their customers. The first chapter concentrates on automation in the contact center. It will explore the technologies, such as interactive voice response and virtual agents. And it will examine what organizations need to evaluate when deciding which processes to automate and which areas will always need a human touch. The second installment delves into digital marketing, mobile applications and social media. It's no longer enough to send the same message to all customers; messages now must be personalized -- and soon, based on where customers are at any given moment. The chapter will look at location-based automated marketing and the pros and cons -- including the loss of privacy -- associated with such practices. The final chapter digs deep into the role of analytics in customer experience management plans, scrutinizing data harvesting methods and ways to use big data to augment customer experiences. And the chapter will look at times when knowing all about your customer goes horribly wrong.

  • Market trends tell the future of predictive analytics deployments

    Predictive analytics employs statistical or machine-learning models to discover patterns and relationships in data, thereby enabling the prediction of future behavior or activity. Long used by credit card companies, predictive analytics -- and now self-service predictive analytics -- is making inroads in organizations of all sizes. Based on a survey of more than 3,000 IT and business professionals, this report analyzes their responses to provide information on implementation status, maturity of implementations, value and vendors of predictive analytics tools.

OTHER FEATURED E-BOOKS

Featured E-HANDBOOKS on searchManufacturingERP.comView all >>

  • Open Group technical document: IT Specialist Certification Accreditation Policy

    Clearly “book learning” is a critical first step to becoming effective at anything. But the effectiveness, potential, and the degree and value of contribution rise to a new level as relevant skills and experience are gained in a topical area. It is clearly important to “know” a subject, but it is more valuable to have applied that knowledge. It is for this reason that The Open Group IT Specialist Certification (ITSC) program is based on an assessment of people skills, technical skills, and experience, not just tests of knowledge.

  • Determine if NoSQL databases are right for your organization

    NoSQL databases offer more flexible alternatives to mainstream relational software, particularly for big data applications. But NoSQL offerings include a diverse set of technologies that can present prospective users with a bewildering array of choices. And those technologies have yet to secure a place in many organizations. In fact, in a survey of IT and business professionals conducted by The Data Warehousing Institute in November 2013, 65% of the respondents said they had no plans to incorporate NoSQL databases into their data warehouse architectures. Don't let that scare you off, though: There are companies successfully putting NoSQL products to work in applications they're suited for.

    In this three-part guide, readers will learn about the different types of NoSQL technologies and their potential uses. First, get details about the four primary NoSQL product categories, with deployment examples from experienced users and advice on how to avoid going down the wrong database path. Next, read about why it's a mistake to force-fit technologies into IT environments -- and why Gartner analyst Merv Adrian says it's a fruitless exercise to compare NoSQL offerings "that are so wildly different in structure and intent." And in our third story, find out why many organizations are creating what consultancy Enterprise Management Associates calls a hybrid data ecosystem -- a blend of old and new technologies, including NoSQL systems -- to support their big data environments.

OTHER FEATURED E-HANDBOOKS